The Best Camping Tent for 2021 (Reviews)

1. Coleman Montana Tent for Camping

4.2/5

2. Coleman Sundome Tent

4.6/5

3. CORE 9 Person Instant Cabin Tent

4.6/5
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It doesn’t matter if you’re a lonely wolf or a big family. When it comes to finding the best camping tent, you must consider the shelter’s portability, resistance to elements, and installation ease. 

Finding a tent that fits the bill is often challenging, but luckily, we know which are the best camping tents around. Check them out in our rundown.

How We Rated Best Tents?

  • Waterproof

    Is it well protected?

  • Ventilation

    Is it breathable?

  • Longevity

    Is it build for years to come?

  • Price

    Is it the best value for your $?

  • Set Up

    Is it easy to set-up?

  • Durability

    Is it strong enough?

  • Convenient

    Is it designed for comfort?

  • Sleeping Capacity

    Is it spacious and roomy?

How We Conducted Research?

  • 18

    Hours Researched

  • 25

    Products Evaluated

  • 11k

    Reviews Considered

  • 2

    Sources Researched

1. Coleman Montana Tent for Camping

4.2/5

Technical Specs:

Why we picked the Coleman Montana Tent for Camping:

One of the best camping tents for families and larger groups, the Coleman Montana is a roomy tent that can easily accommodate up to 8 adults in bivvy sacks or 6 people sleeping on queen-size air beds. 

Designed to withstand moderate rain, the tent also boasts plenty of mesh windows as well as a mesh ceiling. It’s perfect for camping in the warmer season, and pitching it up is also fast and easy. Relatively light for its size and compact enough when packed to fit on a motorbike, this tent is the best for car camping, tailgating, and outings with your family or friends.

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2. Coleman Sundome Tent

4.6/5

Technical Specs:

Why we picked the Coleman Sundome Tent:

Coleman Sundome comes as a great alternative to our best overall. It is ideal for groups of up to 6 people looking for an affordable summer camping tent. A generous interior provides sufficient space for up to two queen-size air mattresses, or you could share the space between six adults in sleeping bags.

The tent boasts a conventional yet easy set up, and comes with a removable rainfly. It’s also relatively light and ideal for 3-season camping.

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3. CORE 9 Person Instant Cabin Tent

4.6/5

Technical Specs:

Why we picked the CORE 9 Person Instant Cabin Tent:

 

Boasting a declared capacity of 9 people, the CORE 9 is an excellent choice if you’re looking after a premium quality camping tent. This shelter is huge, providing sufficient floor space for air beds and gear alike. Preferred by first-time campers for its instant design, it’s easy to set up in less than 5 minutes.

Perfect for the summer, it also boasts a panoramic skylight and plenty of mesh windows. Airflow is further enhanced by convenient vents located at floor level. Two entrances bring further value and overall, this tent is durable enough to stand by your side for the years to come.

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4. Wakeman Outdoors 2-Person Dome Tent

4.2/5

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Why we picked the Wakeman Outdoors 2-Person Dome Tent:

 

Occasional campers and backpackers looking for a small, lightweight tent for maximum two persons will undoubtedly like the Wakeman Outdoors. Perhaps the greatest feature of this tent is the very attractive price point. 

The tent might not be as durable as its more expensive peers, but it does what it’s supposed to do brilliantly. Made from 190T fabric, it keeps you dry in light to moderate rain, and also warm in colder weather. Preferred by bikers and hikers, this camping tent is a great choice for the adventurers on a low budget.

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5. Gazelle T4 Pop up Portable Camping Hub Tent

4.8/5

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Why we picked the Gazelle T4 Pop up Portable Camping Hub Tent:

Designed with families in mind, the Gazelle T4 is an unpretentious tent for camping in warmer climates. It withstands light to moderate rain, while mesh screens and large windows provide plenty of airflow.

Large enough to fit a queen-size air mattress, it’s an excellent choice for parents and up to two younger kids. Highlights also include two doors for easy access as well as storage pockets. The tent also comes in a smaller and larger variant, so you can easily find the right one.

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6. Core 9 Person Extended Dome Tent

4.3/5

Technical Specs:

Why we picked the Core 9 Person Extended Dome Tent:

Another tent from Core that has made it to our list is this extended dome model. Like our premium pick, it boasts a 9-person capacity. However, even if the floor space is actually larger, the dome walls make it feel slightly more claustrophobic than its cabin tent peer above.

That said, you’ll still get plenty of space for both people and gear. The tent can fit three queen-size air beds and boasts a generous head clearance. Mesh screens on the ceiling, a removable fly, and plenty of windows also allow you to achieve the right level of ventilation. Suitable for camping in warmer climates, the tent also holds up well to light rain and wind. An excellent choice for avid campers, tailgaters, as well as anglers and hunters.

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7. Wenzel 8 Person Klondike Tent

4.1/5

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Why we picked the Wenzel 8 Person Klondike Tent:

The Wenzel Klondike might in reality be a 6-person tent instead of an 8-person one, but it’s still one of the most versatile camping tents out there. Its greatest strength is the huge screen room that can sleep three, but that’s more suitable for setting up a covered breakfast or leisure area.

This vestibule comes with a waterproof ceiling and floor, and large mesh panels on the door and walls. As such, it’s perfect to use whenever the weather is mild. The interior is also spacious. Just perfect for 6 adults or a family of four.

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8. Coleman WeatherMaster 6-Person Tent

4.1/5

Technical Specs:

Why we picked the Coleman WeatherMaster 6-Person Tent:

The WeatherMaster 6 is comparable to the Klondike in terms of versatility. Boasting a 6-person capacity, this tent also impresses with a large screened room you can use as a storage vestibule or to create an additional room during summer.

The main living space is longer yet narrower than Klondike’s. You’ll still have plenty of space to set up your camping bed and move around, though. We particularly like the hinged door with awning that provides access to the main sleeping area. Thanks to this feature, the tent is perfect for splitting between two families or a larger gang, as long as you don’t mind the lack of floor or solid panels in the vestibule.

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9. Bessport Easy Setup 3 Season Camping Tent

5/5

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Why we picked the Bessport Easy Setup 3 Season Camping Tent:

The Bessport camping tent is an excellent choice for those who love adventuring alone into the outdoors, or a maximum of two people. Made to withstand whatever the elements are throwing at it, this shelter impresses with a low profile frame and thick, durable walls.

Advertised as a 3-season tent but also suitable to use in winter, as long as the weather is mild, it boasts one entrance, two windows, and two vestibules. This tent also comes in a slightly larger variant that makes it perfect if you also want to keep your gear inside.

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10. HIKERGARDEN 8-Person Camping Tent

5/5

Technical Specs:

Why we picked the HIKERGARDEN 8-Person Camping Tent:

Ending up our list of best camping tents, the HIKERGARDEN  tent can easily satisfy families and larger groups. It can sleep up to 8 adults in sleeping bags, or you can use it for fewer people with lots of gear. 

Ideal for families, it comes with two room dividers, one of which can be turned into a video curtain for cartoons or movie nights. It also boasts a panoramic skylight, and the instant set up allows you to erect it in only 5 minutes. The fiberglass poles are not as strong as steel, but keep weight low. All in all, a great choice for comfortable family camping.

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Camping Tents Buying Guide

Camping is one of the most popular summer activities for many of us. Whether the campsite is the main attraction or just the base for some hiking, finding an adequate sleeping arrangement is essential. Camping tents come in all shapes and sizes, and knowing how to choose the best camping tent for you can make the difference between a stellar and a meh experience.

Types of Camping Tents

The first step to choosing the best camping tent is deciding which type of tent you want. There are two aspects to consider: the shape of the tent and the way you pitch it.

Tent Shapes

Based on shape, we can distinguish between the following types of tents:

  • Cabin tents: Topping the preference of many campers, cabin tents such as the Core 9 are characterized by relatively straight walls and a cabin-like roof, two features that maximize internal space. Their square footprint also adds stability, although wind resistance isn’t the best. On the downside, cabin tents are fairly heavy and harder to set up than other tent types.
  • Ridge tents: Perhaps the oldest types of tents, they are characterized by an A-frame and a relatively large footprint. However, the angled walls compromise the interior space as well as the head room. Despite this downside, ridge tents are still preferred by those who like their retro vibe and look for a well-pitched tent that can hold up better than most modern tents can.
  • Dome tents: As their name suggests, they have a dome shape that enhances wind resistance. This is the type of tent you’d want for winter or extreme weather camping, but keep in mind that you won’t have much of head clearance. Also remember that the larger the tent, the lower stability, and wind resistance it will have.
  • Tunnel tents: A combination between a cabin and a dome – like the HIKERGARDEN tent – tunnel tents impress with nearly vertical walls and a domed roof. They provide lots of space as well as enhanced wind resistance compared to cabin tents. They are usually recommended for families or campers who like loads of space.
  • Geodesic tents: Look like the dome tents at first glance, but consist of multiple crisscrossing poles that enhance stability and weather resistance. These are the most suitable tents for camping in extreme conditions, usually preferred by explorers and adventurers.
  • Bell tents: Fashionably looking, bell tents consist of a single-pole, and a canvas draped and stretched out over it. While these tents have poorer wind resistance, they provide plenty of room and are perfect for those who like luxury camping.

Pitching Options

Now that you know what tent shapes you can choose from, there are three pitching options – traditional, instant, and pop-up.

  • Traditional pitch tents: Are the oldest models that come with separate poles and canopy. Pitching them often requires more than 10 minutes – for instance, it takes around 15 minutes to set up the Coleman Montana tent – and they are heavier than the other two types. Nevertheless, they are typically more resistant.
  • Instant tents: Come with pre-attached poles that simplify pitching. Erecting them requires under 10 minutes, and they are equally easy to dismantle. Some manufacturers make the poles removable, so you can replace them if they break, while others come with fixed poles that can’t be replaced.
  • Popup tents: A variety of instant tents, they are designed to literally pop up when removed from their bag. Pitching often takes under 5 minutes, but folding them back could be troublesome. These types of tents also come with permanent pre-attached poles that can’t be replaced if they break.

Camping Tent Size

Once you have chosen the desired shape and style, you must consider the size of the tent you need. There aren’t any rules, but you should know that manufacturers often state a tent’s capacity based on how many people it can fit if they sleep in sleeping bags.

If you don’t like crowded spaces or want to bring a camping cot or air mattress with you, go for a larger size. For instance, a 3-person tent is desirable for a couple and camping gear, and so on.

Single Wall vs. Double Wall Tents. Which is Best?

Tents can have either single or double walls – the latter consisting of the main section and a rainfly on top of it. Due to the absence of a tarp, single-wall tents are lighter and faster to pitch. They are often preferred by backpackers who like to travel light but are more prone to condensation problems. On the contrary, double-wall tents have fewer condensation problems but are slightly heavier.

Which is the best camping tent is ultimately down to you, but if you decide to go for a single wall tent, pick a model with proper ventilation, or you could wake up in a puddle.

Camping Tent Poles

Another important thing to consider before buying are the tent poles. You can typically choose between aluminum or fiberglass poles.

Aluminum poles are lightweight, durable, and resistant, but relatively expensive; fiberglass poles are more flexible, but heavier. They offer good resistance but are less durable than aluminum.

Once again, consider your camping style before deciding. If you need a tent for casual summer camping that is light and withstands light to moderate wind, fiberglass poles could be a great choice. For extreme weather camping, go for a tent with aluminum poles.

Features to Look for in Camping Tents

A few other important features to look for in a camping tent include:

  • Weight: Are you car camping or backpacking? A heavy tent might not be an issue to transport by car, but if you have to walk for a longer distance to the campsite or like backpacking, a lighter tent will be easier to carry.
  • Packed size: Similar to the weight, the packed size tells you how hard or easy it will be to carry the tent to your campsite.
  • Number of doors: If you’re camping alone or with your better half, one door could suffice. For larger groups, go for a tent with two doors could minimize nighttime jostling.
  • Ventilation: The best camping tents are perhaps the double-wall models consisting of a mesh main section and rainfly; these tents allow for proper airflow, especially on those hot summer days and nights.

FAQ

• What is the Best Camping Tent Brand?

If you’re looking for the best value for money when picking a camping tent, you can’t go wrong with a tent from Core or Coleman. Both brands brag with their durable tents; overall, the tents from Core offer higher resistance to wind and rain, whereas Coleman have good performance and typically lower price tags.

• What Tent Should I Buy for Camping?

It really depends on your needs. For family camping, a tent such as the Coleman Montana or Core 9 Instant Cabin could be your best bets. Both tents are roomy enough for families with up to 4 kids and lots of gear. The Coleman Sundome, on the other hand, is a better choice for hikers. This tent comes in various sizes, has good resistance to elements, and is very affordable.

• What is The Best Tent for The Money?

Coleman Montana is undeniably the best camping tent for the money if you’re looking for a larger capacity tent. If you don’t mind dropping more cash for a more feature-packed product, the Core 9 Instant Cabin is a great alternative.

• Are Expensive Tents Worth it?

An expensive tent isn’t necessarily a high quality one, but as a rule of thumb, the more durable and resistant to elements the tent is, the more expensive it is. This because the technologies used to improve water tightness and wind resistance are relatively expensive. To assess the overall quality of a tent, it is always recommended to check out its features and read what other users have to say about it, to determine the tent’s value for money.

• When's the Best Time to Buy a Tent?

Interest in purchasing camping gear is always higher during the actual camping season, that’s why buying a tent off season or at the end of the season could save you some money.